About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
extensively. some has warned it has gotten too big. they say it is damaging the environment and ruining people's health. >> from the center, you cannot see what is happening in alps. people have been quarrying marble here since ancient times. even today, a bathtub or garden walk away made of this marble is considered the height of luxury. the region is dependent on marble. excavating equipment has been used and it has changed the surrounding durant -- surrounding landscape entirely. what was once an individual craft has turned into a mechanized industry. environmental activists are fighting against the destruction of the home region. >> to save the alps, the quarrries should be closed if they are at 1,400 meters or higher. >> a century ago, 120,000 tons of marble were quarried here annually. today, it is 5 million tons a year. only a quarter of this is raw material for stonecutters or studios like this one in carrera. the whole new industry is being served. today, 3/4 of the marble is ground to dust. these facilities, most belonging to multinational corporations, would not allow us to film ins
environment, in these countries is relatively more stable. >> last year's massive floods in thailand forced many japanese auto plants to shut down, but their operations have resumed. toyota and nissan plan to expand production in thailand. >>> myanmar emerged from nearly five decades of military rule last year and introduced democratic reforms. now it's becoming a magnet for international investment. china is leading the way. thailand and south korea are also major investors. japan lags behind. but japanese executives are rushing to close the gap. nhk world's satoru aoyama reports from yangon. >> reporter: he's in charge of overseas operations for an osaka-based logistics company. up to now, the company has used a local contractor to do business in myanmar. but executives think it might be time to set up shop. they sent him to size up conditions in yangon. >> translator: the country is full of energy. there is a sense of optimism. people believe tomorrow will be better than today. >> reporter: this japanese sewing factory is a client of kotaka's firm. it produces suits in myanmar that have
by simply cutting up and sewing together pieces of bandanna. next try to create a homey environment. sometimes you just have to bring things from home. lastly, you can forget about smokey barbecues and open fires. think of this as an outdoor restaurant with all your favorite dishes. and after a hearty meal, put together a creative de just stack some simple plastic kitchen ware and voila. you have yourself a cupcake tower. >> translator: immersed in the outdoors i feel like i can just be myself. you can let go of everything. i think that's what makes this experience so worthwhile. >> reporter: usamura says creating your own girls camp isn't just about making it cute. but more about creating a space that fits you best. nhk world. >> now that's taking a camping to a whole new level. >>> it's time now to check in with sayaka mori who has the latest in weather. sayaka, earlier you gave us an update on the storm impacting the eastern coast of the united states. how are weather conditions elsewhere around the world? >> yes, catherine. heavy rain is coming down in parts of southwestern chin
per day. bees live in highly organized societies that adapt rapidly to their environment, but they are under increasing threat from humans. this film director spent five years researching why bees were dying out. his film aims to wake people up to the problem. >> over the last six years, 30% of the population has died every year in europe, north america, and china. in parts of switzerland, the number is 70%. sometimes in america, it is between 50% and 70%, but on average, 30% every year. if it keeps going on like that, our valleys will soon look pretty sad. >> they're dying because of mites, bacteria, and parasites, a result of large-scale beekeeping. >> >> it is like wit -- >> it is like we are capitalists. we want to grow. total global domination. >> miller looks after 15,000 hives. he moves them between plantations of apple and -- allman and apple blossom, transporting them all across the u.s. -- plantations of almond and apple blossom. >> in reality, agriculture has to work in partnership with the bees, but when i approached agriculture department's in switzerland, th
. >> it was high noon at the chancellor's office in berlin. demonstrators give the environment minister a petition with 100,000 signatures calling for germany to stick to its energy policy, phasing out nuclear and boosting renewals, but the minister says the switch must not be too expensive. >> it is also true that the costs have to be affordable for the economy, for individual citizens, entrepreneurs, artisans, small business people, and the middle classes. >> one week ago, all 16 of germany's federal states pledged to support the government's federal energy strategy. the chancellor was encouraged to see politicians come together across party lines. am i think at our meeting today, everyone understood that the task ahead is huge and that everyone must do their part. >> offshore when parks was a major topic of friday's meeting of federal and state leaders -- offshore wind parks. it is a subject close to the heart of germany's coastal states. >> the tenor of the meeting is that we should organize one big plan, not 16 little ones forming a whole. so we feel good about today. >> the chancellor did no
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5